A New Year, A New You

New year’s resolutions are gaining a full head of steam. More people are deciding to seek the devout Catholic life. Weight loss may still reign at the top of many lists, but it’s very admirable for someone to add to their list to become a better Catholic. To commit fewer sins, to go to Mass on a regular basis, to frequent the confessional more often, or have a better prayer life.

With change comes discipline and the act of the will. This involves breaking old habits and forming new ones. Habits can be changed in a matter of weeks. The will acts as a beacon. A person that wants change in their life wills it. When a person decides to take their faith more serious and become a more devout Catholic, there are so many avenues one may venture.

While the list may go on within such prayer avenues, it’s the obvious approach people tend to miss. There are prayers and practices that fills the soul and are easily accessible. This simple approach to the devout life doesn’t involve a “feel good” conference for a quick “Jesus jolt.” An effective approach to the devout begins with ancient Liturgy.

The Traditional Latin Mass is the gateway to the devout. A reverent Eucharistic sacrifice is the foundation. People that take the Liturgy seriously are more likely to take their faith seriously.

“When we receive Holy Communion, we experience something extraordinary – a joy, a fragrance, a well being that thrills the whole body and causes it to exalt.” –St. John Vianney

Eating healthy and exercising promotes a healthy side effect–weight loss. The same goes for attending a reverent Liturgy such as the Latin Mass. Mass that is taken seriously and treated reverently could itself net a healthy side effect–the intent to take the faith seriously. A genuine attempt to live the Christian life as God wills.

Lex orandi, lex credendi is a Latin phrase that refers to good Liturgy championing good theology. Not only that, but beautiful, reverent Liturgy can lead to a devoted prayer life. The Latin Mass is an accessible approach to a bona fide spiritual growth.

“The heavens open and multitudes of angels come to assist in the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.” –St. Gregory

Soul-satisfying Liturgy from the Latin Mass can be the momentum needed to devote oneself into deeper prayer outside of the Mass. The Rosary is a most powerful prayer. It is a mighty weapon against Satan and his minions. Sinful temptations may also falter. The Rosary is also a chance to spend silent time meditating on the Mysteries of Christ through the Blessed Mother.

“The greatest method of praying is to pray the Rosary.” –Saint Francis de Sales

One may also choose to pray the Rosary in Latin. It is the liturgical tongue of the Church. There are good reasons for praying the Rosary in Latin. There is less distraction while meditating on the mysteries. Moreover, the devil hates Latin; he loathes Latin. The evil one is fully aware how powerful and rich praying (or speaking) in Latin is to Catholics. Latin in the Liturgy dates back over a thousand years, and some believe that the earliest Masses were offered in Latin. The traditional Rosary in Latin is a personal preference. The Most Holy Rosary offers the Rosary in both Latin and English.

“The Rosary is the most excellent form of prayer and the most efficacious means of attaining eternal life. It is the remedy for all our evils, the root of all our blessings. There is no more excellent way of praying.” –Pope Leo XIII

The Divine Office, or in Latin Divinum Officium, is a most important prayer that the Church offers using a liturgical book known as a Breviary. Traditionally these prayers are chanted by monks and nuns, but may also be recited by devout Catholic faithful. The Divine Office is made up the 150 Psalms that are spread throughout the week, and also incorporates readings from Sacred Scripture, commentaries from the Fathers and Doctors of the Church, and short accounts of the saints lives. A beautiful aspect of the Divine Office is that it follows the traditional liturgical calendar of the Church. One can easily incorporate the Divine Office morning prayer (Laudes) and evening prayer (Vespers) as part of their daily routine.

The Traditional Latin Mass, Rosary, and Divine Office are three obtainable methods to live a robust, healthy, and devout life with Christ in His Church.

by John Connor

Related articles:
Liturgy You Deserve
Getting to Know the Mother of Jesus
Born to be Magnificent

Welcome to the Masquerade

The Roman Empire was a hostile environment for Christians prior to its tolerance by the Emperor Constantine in the 4th century. Even when the Romans allowed Christians to freely practice Catholicism there was still a taste of disdain between Catholics and pagans.

To be a Catholic in the first three centuries, prior to its tolerance, meant your life was on the line. Where as today if you publicly declare devout Catholicity, you may get mocked or ridiculed for believing that life begins at conception, or that marriage is between one man and one woman. You may even get bantered for being too traditional or orthodox. Sure there may be some jeering here and there, but for the early Christians you could be martyred for publicly proclaiming to be a follower of Jesus Christ.

Some people were content to closet their faith and wear masks. Not physical masks, but spiritual, in order to avoid martyrdom. While other Catholics chose not to hide behind a mask. They chose to live and share their faith openly knowing full well it may cost them their life, and were willing to sacrifice their lives in order to preach the truth.

“Jesus said to him, ‘I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.” –John 14:6

Christ is Truth. To be a Catholic, a Christian, we are called to live truth, and to proclaim that truth to others, whether it be family, friends, or strangers. Professing the truth isn’t easy when there’s hostility in the air. Truth is also rigid. It is objective rather than subjective. But we need structure such as the Latin Mass. It focuses our attention on truth. Christ never said it was going to be easy, but He promised everlasting life in heaven if we endure.

The majority of the apostles were martyred for proclaiming the Truth of Catholicism, except for the apostle John who was exiled on the island of Patmos. Many early Christians freely gave up their lives for the faith. They did not wear (spiritual) masks. They did not hide. They openly shared the faith with others. Some may assert, “yes but they were followers of Christ,” which is true, but we too are called to be followers of Christ, to be disciples. That is what it means to be a Catholic. We do not hide from Truth. We affirm Truth. We profess Truth every Mass when we say the Credo.

In every age there has been a masquerade. Some Catholics choose to don their spiritual masks, losing sight of being a witness that attests to the true Catholic faith. While others chose to live authentic traditional Catholic lives publicly. Not afraid to shout from the rooftops that they adore Christ in traditional Catholicism and all the teachings of the Church.

“I came that they may have life, and have it abundantly.” –John 10:10

Christ promised us everlasting life. That begins here and now by cooperating, living, and sharing the beauty of traditional Catholicism with others, and to affirm all the teachings of the Church.

“For to this you have been called, because Christ also suffered for you, leaving you an example, so that you should follow in his steps.” –1 Peter 2:21

We are to be imitators of Christ (Ephesians 5:1). As Catholics we are to set the example of Christian Truth to others, to lead and to teach just as Christ did. That means we must not mask what is true and authentic when it comes to Christ or Catholicism.

Everything that occurs within the Body of Christ effects you and I, whether directly and indirectly. This goes for the sanctity of life, the sanctity of marriage, the sanctity of the human person, and the sanctity of gender–masculine men and feminine women.

The masquerade is here and now. We are among wolves in sheep’s clothing (Matthew 7:15), but Christ promised us that if we endure to the end we’ll have everlasting life. Sitting at the Heavenly banquet with Him. It is not too late. It’s never too late to change hearts. We should pray for others that their masks come off. You may know people who claim to be Catholic but don’t necessarily agree with or outwardly live the faith. There will always be to some level a masquerade in the Church, but with authentic traditional Catholicism there is hope. Thankfully more and more Catholics are finding the beauty and Truth in traditional Catholicism.

“You will know the truth, and the truth will make you free.” –John 8:32

by John Connor

Why Be Catholic?

Christianity has been around for nearly two millennium. It is as diverse as the depths of the oceans. Vast cultural characteristics span around the globe within Christian communities. For those that are Christian, or on the cusp of considering the Christian faith, the next logical question is, why be Catholic?

Catholicism proclaims the fullness of the Christian faith. It has only been in the past 500 years or so that Christianity became diverse through Protestantism and pseudo-Christian sects. In order to live the Christian life to the fullest, we have to ask, why be Catholic? The foundation of Catholicism is that Christ started one Church, not many church communities. It is an unbroken link that leads to the present. As Catholics, we shouldn’t take our faith for granted. We need to be able to answer the question, why Catholicism?

The phrase “Kingdom of God” occurs approximately 122 times in the New Testament, primarily spoken by Jesus Himself. “The Kingdom is not a thing, it is not a geographical dominion like worldly kingdoms. It is a person; it is he. On this interpretation, the term ‘Kingdom of God’ is itself a veiled Christology. By the way in which he speaks of the Kingdom of God, Jesus leads men to realize the overwhelming fact that in him God himself is present among them, that he is God’s presence.” (Pope Benedict XVI, Jesus of Nazareth, Part 1)

Christ in essence is the Church, the cornerstone. But not simply a mystical church, where Jesus (i.e. Kingdom of God) is spiritually everywhere or only in our hearts, but it’s a living, breathing Church.

The earthly kingdom (i.e. the Church) and the heavenly kingdom are interrelated. They are in essence one. We see this in the Gospel of Matthew when Jesus founded the Catholic Church.

“And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not prevail against it. I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven.” –Matthew 16:18-19

We can establish two principles here. One, Jesus founded one church, singular tense. Two, that this church, singular tense, would have the power to bind and loose. What ever is bound and loosed on earth will be bound or loosed in heaven. Christ did not merely establish a mystical church, He primarily established a physical church, and He made that Church authoritative in terms of binding and loosing.

Jesus passed on His authority onto His apostles (Matthew 28:18-20). The authority given by God doesn’t end with the death of the last apostle. No. Jesus proclaimed the gates of hell shall not prevail. The apostles were tasked with evangelizing. Sharing the good news (Gospel) to all known nations. In order to do this the apostles had to pass on their authority onto others. This is called apostolic succession. For 2,000 years there has been an unbroken line of bishops from the apostles authority given by Christ, to the current living bishops.

It is impossible for Sacred Scripture to be the sole authority of the Christian life. Scripture is not authoritative unless someone with authority, given by Christ, makes it so. Just like the Constitution of the United States is not authoritative unless the branches of the government, such as the judicial branch, makes it authoritative. Believe it or not, there was a time when there was no Bible. For nearly four centuries, there was no canonized Scripture. No table of contents. It took decades after the Ascension of Christ for the apostles to write the New Testament. Some theologians believe that the last writings were by the apostle John around A.D. 68. That’s over thirty years after the Ascension. Before anything was written the Church had only Sacred Tradition. Not to be confused with “traditions of men” or man-made tradition. Sacred Tradition begat Sacred Scripture, all bound by the Magisterium of the Church–the bishops in union with the Successor of Peter, the Pope.

It would take nearly a thousand years before the Church would see its first split, East and West. Then another 500 years after that before the Church would see a multiple fracture occur in the Protestant Revolt. But the gates of hell shall not prevail. The One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church has stood strong since the time of Christ.

While Holy Mother Church is the pinnacle of holiness, there is still the human element attached to the Church. No Catholic parish is perfect. No priest, bishop, or even the pope is perfect, or impeccable. The Catholic Church itself is perfect. We have a perfect Liturgy in the Traditional Latin Mass, full of beauty and reverence, with all the “smells and bells.” We have a perfect Eucharistic sacrifice given to us by Christ Himself that occurs at every Mass. Catholicism is the fullness of Christianity. Even though modernism and the progressive movement emits itself within the Church today, we can and should embrace our traditional Catholic faith.

“Wherever the bishop shall appear, there let the multitude [of the people] also be; even as, wherever Jesus Christ is, there is the Catholic Church.” –St. Ignatius of Antioch, c. A.D 110

by John Connor

Battling Sin

Temptation can manifest from the “three enemies of the soul,” the world, the devil, and the flesh. There is an on-going spiritual war happening. Our soul’s eternal destination is at stake. We all have a choice to make. The Beatific Vision and eternal joy in Heaven, or eternal separation from God (i.e. Hell). God does not send us to Hell. Because we have free will, we can ultimately determine our fate by whether or not we cooperate with God’s Love.

From the residue of original sin, human beings have a tendency to sin by even the most subtle temptations. In order to battle these temptations, we have to be more aware of what tempts us, causing us to sin. We can win this spiritual battle.

It is time to put on the full armor of God.

“Finally, brethren, be strengthened in the Lord, and in the might of his power. Put you on the armour of God, that you may be able to stand against the deceits of the devil. For our wrestling is not against flesh and blood; but against principalities and power, against the rulers of the world of this darkness, against the spirits of wickedness in the high places. Therefore take unto you the armour of God, that you may be able to resist in the evil day, and to stand in all things perfect. Stand therefore, having your loins girt about with truth, and having on the breastplate of justice, And your feet shod with the preparation of the gospel of peace: In all things taking the shield of faith, wherewith you may be able to extinguish all the fiery darts of the most wicked one. And take unto you the helmet of salvation, and the sword of the Spirit (which is the word of God). By all prayer and supplication praying at all times in the spirit; and in the same watching with all instance and supplication for all the saints.” –Ephesians 6:10-18

Reminding ourselves of personal sinful struggles is not easy. In fact, it’s easier to hide from them or pretend they don’t exist. Satan will try to convince you that you are a “good person.” Why? Because “good people” believe they’ve “run up a very favorable credit-balance in God’s ledger,” but they risk committing the sin of pride. There is always a need for God’s love and mercy. The devout life is obtainable to anyone who seeks it.

On the opposite end of the spectrum of pride, there is despair. Despair occurs when you think you’re sins are too numerous for God to forgive. Hogwash! There is no sin too great or great in number that God cannot forgive you. The only sins that cannot be forgiven are those that you do not confess to Christ in the confessional. Ask for forgiveness with a contrite heart and your sins will be forgiven when the priest, through Christ, absolves you.

The closer you become to living a saintly life on earth, which is possible by the way, the more aware you become of those particular temptations and sins. It is like shining a light on your “blemishes.”

The saints are great examples of how to live a devout life. They were not born saints. And some were downright scoundrels before they found their conversion. Take St. Augustine of Hippo for instance, before his conversion he lived a very worldly life, even by today’s standards. It was through the prayers of his mother and saint, Monica, that he was transformed anew. Augustine made a choice, and that choice was to live his life for God. He is now a saint and doctor of the Church.

“There is no saint without a past, no sinner without a future.” –St. Augustine of Hippo

You take a big step forward by admitting you are a sinner in need of God’s love and mercy. God, along with the angels and saints, are on your side in this spiritual war. Christ did not die on the Cross and then leave it up to you to figure out how to conquer sin. Hardly. Christ, whether spiritually present, or physically present in the Eucharist, is leading the charge.

First and foremost, be authentic. Men, do not shy away from your masculinity. We live in an emasculated secular world. Look to Christ as an example of how to be authentic, masculine, Catholic men. Your role is to protect the women around you, both physically and spiritually. Ladies, your femininity is a gift from God. Do not hide from it either. Allow the Blessed Virgin Mary to be your role model of authentic Catholic femininity.

Avoid the near occasion of sin as best you can. Your eyes are the “gateway to the soul.” Custody of the eyes helps to avoid lust in particular. Socialize with other traditional Catholics. Socialize in places that will not lead you to sin, nor be tempted. Sometimes it’s helpful to keep yourself occupied. An idle mind can be dangerous. There are moments where you could feel spiritual dryness as if God has deserted you, or you may fall into depression. Do not let this deter you from living your life for God.

“It is funny how mortals always picture us as putting things into their minds: in reality our best work is done by keeping things out.” C.S. Lewis, Screwtape Letters

The Church has given us great weapons to battle sin and lead us to victory. Start with daily prayer. The Rosary is one of the greatest weapons against evil. Another very powerful prayer is the Prayer to St. Michael the Archangel. If I’m going into a spiritual battle I want St. Michael at my side. Pray it daily. Praying the Divine Office (Divinum Officium, 1960 Rubrics) is also very spiritually beneficial. Prayer is our communication with God, whether we’re talking or listening to Him. This assures us that God is part of our lives. There’s also mortification. Sometimes denying yourself of something you want can strengthen your soul. You may start with turning down dessert after dinner, or praying the Rosary in place of your favorite television program.

Be aware of your temptations. The spiritual attacks are often subtle. A venial sin can grow into a mortal sin before you know it. You have what it takes to battle the temptations and sins of the world, the flesh, and the evil one, Satan. If you commit a sin, go to Confession. Not only will you be forgiven, but you’ll receive graces to overcome the temptations next time. Then you’ll be prepared to get back into the fray. You can win this spiritual battle.

by John Connor

The Catholic Roots of Halloween

A cloud of mystery surrounds Halloween. There are some who believe it is the “devil’s night,” while others it is simply a secular night of dressing in costumes to go trick-or-treating. There is more to the modern Halloween traditions, and they go back centuries.

It’s a natural reaction for Catholics to distance themselves from anything that involves the occult. Rather than disregard Halloween all together, one must search the depths that surround an important Solemnity and is deeply imbedded in Catholic tradition.

Asking for the saints to intercede on our behalf has been part of Catholic Tradition since early Christianity, and is also deeply rooted in Sacred Scripture (cf. Revelation 5:8, Hebrews 12:1, and 2 Maccabees 12:39-45). In the early 8th century Pope Gregory III instituted All Hallows’ Day (or All Saints’ Day), on November 1, as a Solemn day–also a Holy Day of Obligation–to remember those who have attained heaven. Within a century this Solemnity spread throughout the entire Church thanks to Pope Gregory IV and was declared a universal feast day.

The Irish-Gaelic winter festival, known as Samhain, began to be celebrated hundreds of years after the institution of the Solemnity of All Saints’ Day, and it’s vigil, All Hallows’ Evening. Samhain was a festival that marked the beginning of winter in Ireland and was practiced by non-Christian pagans. Some Neopagans in recent years claim that Halloween has pagan origins and is derived from the pagan festival, Samhain, but the burden of proof simply doesn’t stack up.

The word Halloween is a contraction of All Hallows’ Evening, and is the vigil of the Solemnity of All Saints’ Day. The night before All Saints’ Day people would offer prayers to the dead, sometimes within cemeteries themselves since they are “hallowed” ground. In parts of Europe, people would light bonfires and carve turnips (or in America, pumpkins). They would also collect treats, known as soul cakes. Soul cakes were small round cakes topped with a mark of the cross to signify alms. The tradition of giving these sweet, savory treats was celebrated in Britain and Ireland during the Middle Ages. This tradition continues today in some countries, such as Portugal.

Local customs and traditions varied from different areas, but the aspects of Halloween, such as believing in ghosts and demons, were deeply rooted among the Catholic people. Catholics believed that at certain times of the year, Christmas included, that the “veil” between Purgatory, Heaven, and even Hell, became more thin and one could see the souls in Purgatory (ghosts) and demons. This eventually led to people dressing up in costumes.

The first major attack on Halloween became apparent in Post-reformation England where the celebrations of local Halloween customs were outlawed. In the Northeastern United States, Puritans outlawed both Halloween and Christmas. It wasn’t until the 19th century when Irish-Catholic immigrants revitalized Halloween and All Saints’ Day in the United States.

The opposition on Halloween continued into the 20th century, largely by anti-Catholic and anti-Irish groups. Halloween was also becoming more commercialized, and secularized. Halloween and Christmas traditions and customs that were once so deeply rooted in Catholicism had been whitewashed and deemphasized by the secular culture.

The attacks on Halloween surged again in the 1970s and 80s with anti-Catholic fundamentalists. Halloween began to be referred to as “the devil’s night” and urban legends started to spread to dissuade people from partaking in festive celebrations. Horror and “slasher” movies became synonymous with the “scares and frights” of Halloween, such as John Carpenter’s 1978 cult-classic, Halloween.

Today, many Catholics are unaware of the Catholic roots of Halloween, along with the more-so recent anti-Catholic attacks on Halloween. Since the 8th century we have celebrated the Solemnity of All Saints Day and its vigil. It’s a special day for us to ask the saints to intercede and pray for us. Whether one decides to participate in the celebration of the vigil, All Hallows’ Eve, is a personal choice. Dressing in costumes, carving pumpkins (and turnips), and collecting treats have been done for many centuries, not to mention praying for the dead, and they are all Catholic. Celebrate Halloween with an All Saints’ party. Dress up as your favorite saint, play games, collect treats. You could even decorate candles to be used for praying for your deceased loved ones. It’s time to put the Catholic back in Halloween.

Traditional Halloween folk song (chorus):
A soul! a soul! a soul-cake!
Please good Missis, a soul-cake!
An apple, a pear, a plum, or a cherry,
Any good thing to make us all merry.
One for Peter, two for Paul
Three for Him who made us all.

by John Connor

Liturgy You Deserve

When one attends Holy Mass, there are two essentials that one may reasonably expect, namely good music and a good homily. This expectation is not demanding, and in fact it is not demanding enough. To understand better this point, let us take a deeper look beyond these two elements (music and homily) towards the Liturgy itself.

In terms of liturgical worship, we seek out the supernatural, something with spiritual substance and depth. Deep down we hunger for a Liturgy that is rich and steeped in tradition. This desire flows from our love of God which spurs us on to offer the very best to Him.

“When the Eucharist is being celebrated, the sanctuary is filled with countless angels who adore the divine victim immolated on the altar.” –St. John Chrysostom

In the contemporary world, one can hear a great sermon plus entertaining music at a “mega church.” As Catholics, we are attracted to a liturgy that will satisfy our spiritual hunger. The Mass should be out of the ordinary (literally, “extra-ordinary”), rather than ordinary.

Instead of Jesus coming to us at the Mass on a natural level, we want to be supernaturally caught up to the mystical heavenly banquet that takes place right before our very eyes at Mass.

“It would be easier for the world to survive without the sun than to do without Holy Mass.” –St. Padre Pio

A priest’s primary role is to help us get to heaven by way of the Sacraments. His job is to administer the Sacraments, especially celebrating the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass–the Eucharist. All other side ministries and projects a priest may start or be involved in are secondary to his primary, sacramental role.

You should expect more from the Mass, and here’s how.

Ad Orientem
If one wishes to experience something “ever ancient and yet ever new,” attend a Mass wherein the priest faces the East. This is known as ad orientem worship. For the past several decades, most priests celebrate Mass versus populum, which means “facing the people.” We are more familiar with this posture. For over a millennium, however, Mass was always celebrated ad orientem and this direction has a lot of beautiful and rich symbolism.

“For as the lightning cometh forth from the east, and is seen even unto the west; so shall be the coming of the Son of man.” –Matthew 24:27

This way we all face the same direction in joyful expectation of Christ returning to us from the east.

If one has never been to a Mass where the priest faces ad orientem, it may look like the priest is turning his back to the people. This may cause people to feel offended, like they do not matter. A priest with a charming or charismatic personality comes across stronger when he is facing you. This may seem warm and inviting, but the priest has a very important duty to perform, and that is to offer the Eucharistic sacrifice at the Mass.

When a priest celebrates ad orientem, he empties himself of his own personality, and you get a clearer picture of the Mass being a sacrifice. At Mass the priest stands “in the person of Christ” or, in Latin, in persona Christi. As the priest steps up to the altar to offer the Eucharistic sacrifice on our behalf, he is in essence entering the holy of holies. Standing before God Almighty to offer Him the greatest sacrifice–the Eucharist.

When we all face the same direction, in other words, facing God, the priest and the laity together offer worship to Him. When the priest faces the people, the Mass can come across as a theatrical play, or a simple call and response. The priest “calls” and we “respond.” When the priest faces ad orientem, it is not to insult, but to lead us in worship and adoration.


Sacred Music
God deserves the best music at Mass. By “best,” I do not mean the organist’s capabilities or the cantor singing in key or loud enough for the parish to hear. Rather, I speak of what best pleases God, what best brings out our internal participation from the external.

There are so many different musical genres to choose from. But the genre of music that deserves the most respect at Mass is not the most-trendy, upbeat music. The sanctuary of the church is a sacred place where the Eucharistic sacrifice is offered to God. Sacred music best fits a sacred liturgy.

At Mass we embark on a sacred journey where we take part in a thanksgiving sacrifice–the Eucharist. Music that is sacred fits properly with the sacredness of the liturgy. Some contemporary styles of music do not necessarily resonate the sacred, but they are entertaining. Being entertained at Mass can distract us from what is happening at the altar. Sacred music will heighten our senses far above the outward feelings and emotions we get from, for example, the praise and worship style of music.

“The Church acknowledges Gregorian chant as specially proper to the Roman liturgy: therefore, other things being equal, it should be given pride of place in liturgical services.” –Sacrosanctum Concilium, par. 116

Chant and polyphony are preferred by the Church, but there are plenty of traditional hymns that properly fit the criteria of sacred music. Sacred music has a mystical “awe” about it, because it is simply that–sacred. It does not convey being “entertained” at Mass as the Mass is not about being entertained, it is about worship, adoration, and sacrifice. Sacred music reflects this fact.

Lex orandi, lex credendi is a Latin phrase that means “the law of praying [is] the law of believing.” In other words, good liturgy leads to good theology, or, the way you worship is the way you believe. If Mass is beautiful, reverent, and sacred, one is more likely to see clearly (and hopefully accept) the doctrines of the Church, especially the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist.

In the Latin Church, there are two expressions of the Latin Liturgy—the Extraordinary Form and the Ordinary Form. Many Catholics today are more familiar with the Ordinary Form as it is the use most seen and practiced today. I would, however, like to focus upon the Extraordinary Form for a moment as I believe it most closely represents what I have herein discussed about liturgical worship.

What is beautiful about the Extraordinary Form is that it incorporates both ad orientem and sacred music. Moreover, it is almost entirely in Latin and there’s something sacred about Latin in the liturgy. It is the liturgical tongue of the Latin Church. At the Extraordinary Form, one uses all five senses, especially at a High Mass wherein there are more “bells and whistles.” One will see a liturgy that is beautiful and reverent. Liturgy should not feel plain and mundane. No, it should lift us up from the mundane to God. Liturgy that will truly feed us, yet leave us hungry for more, is a Liturgy worth attending.

God has given us a most beautiful Liturgy in the Extraordinary Form to offer worship to Him. Rather than say I “deserve” the Latin Mass, it is this beautiful Liturgy that helps me offer my best to God.

by John Connor

Related articles:
Why Be Catholic
Why I Love Traditional Catholicism
Lord, I’m Not Worthy

How To Avoid Distractions and Live a Devout Life

You strive to live a good Catholic life, but you find yourself being bombarded with distractions at the most random moments. It can impede living a devout Catholic life.

We live in a modern world that is full of distractions in the form of electronics. Sometimes distractions can be a means to temporarily escape from your busy life in order to relax. Anybody that owns a television, computer, tablet, or smart phone knows how easy it is to be distracted.

Distractions from God can be dangerous to your spiritual life. “And this I say for your own profit; not that I may cast a snare upon you, but for that which is seemly, and that ye may attend upon the Lord without distraction.” (1 Corinthians 7:35)

Because of original sin we have a natural tendency to focus on our own needs, rather than what God wants from us. Spiritually speaking we are like children that seek attention. We have to fulfill our basic physical needs, to eat healthy and get plenty of rest, but then we fall short on our basic spiritual needs–to spend time with our Lord, to adore Him, and to give him thanks every day.

The distractions are there. They are real. You’re familiar with what distracts you. Thankfully you also notice your need to spend time with Christ every day. Father Larry Richards says, “we are called to be people of prayer, and we are called to be people of love.”

We spend time with Christ at least once a week at Mass. This is the most opportune time for you to push aside all distractions and encounter Him in the Liturgy. If at all possible, arrive early so you can procure some quiet time and prepare for encountering Him in the Eucharist. You will get the most out of the Mass by this preparation. Yes, that means arriving at church early. This is a simple act of love on your part, by giving God more of your time. Also, spend a few minutes after Mass in silent prayer offering thanksgiving to Jesus for allowing Him to come and nourish your soul in the Eucharist. You can never spend too much time in the presence of our Lord at church.

Mass is about active participation. Not just an external participation with liturgical responses and singing, but there is a deeper, rather, supernatural participation that happens within. An internal, contemplative participation that reaches the depths of your soul. Your connection to the Mass uses all five sense that resonates to your inner participation. Whenever your distracted by one of your five senses, it interrupts your internal participation. Distractions come and go. Focus your eyes on what’s happening at the altar. That’s where the Lord makes Himself physically present in the Eucharist, and you want to receive all the graces you can to nourish you physically and spiritually.

Prayer is life-changing. It’s how we communicate with Christ and to deepen our relationship with Him, but we usually do all the talking. There are times in prayer where we need to listen to Him speak to us. In addition to praying the Rosary or other recited prayers, include silent prayer in your prayer regiment. Silent prayer (e.g. Ignatian Examen; Lectio Divina) is a deep and rich way to encounter Christ. Turn off all electronic devices when in silent prayer. You will find silent, contemplative prayer methods will enrich your prayer life.

We cannot completely get away from distractions. Our mind can be our worst enemy because it wanders from here to there. Ask Christ to help you. To shift your focus from yourself onto Him. He will guide you to a more devout life.

by John Connor

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