How To Avoid Distractions and Live a Devout Life

You strive to live a good Catholic life, but you find yourself being bombarded with distractions at the most random moments. It can impede living a devout Catholic life.

We live in a modern world that is full of distractions in the form of electronics. Sometimes distractions can be a means to temporarily escape from your busy life in order to relax. Anybody that owns a television, computer, tablet, or smart phone knows how easy it is to be distracted.

Distractions from God can be dangerous to your spiritual life. “And this I say for your own profit; not that I may cast a snare upon you, but for that which is seemly, and that ye may attend upon the Lord without distraction.” (1 Corinthians 7:35)

Because of original sin we have a natural tendency to focus on our own needs, rather than what God wants from us. Spiritually speaking we are like children that seek attention. We have to fulfill our basic physical needs, to eat healthy and get plenty of rest, but then we fall short on our basic spiritual needs–to spend time with our Lord, to adore Him, and to give him thanks every day.

The distractions are there. They are real. You’re familiar with what distracts you. Thankfully you also notice your need to spend time with Christ every day. Father Larry Richards says, “we are called to be people of prayer, and we are called to be people of love.”

We spend time with Christ at least once a week at Mass. This is the most opportune time for you to push aside all distractions and encounter Him in the Liturgy. If at all possible, arrive early so you can procure some quiet time and prepare for encountering Him in the Eucharist. You will get the most out of the Mass by this preparation. Yes, that means arriving at church early. This is a simple act of love on your part, by giving God more of your time. Also, spend a few minutes after Mass in silent prayer offering thanksgiving to Jesus for allowing Him to come and nourish your soul in the Eucharist. You can never spend too much time in the presence of our Lord at church.

Mass is about active participation. Not just an external participation with liturgical responses and singing, but there is a deeper, rather, supernatural participation that happens within. An internal, contemplative participation that reaches the depths of your soul. Your connection to the Mass uses all five sense that resonates to your inner participation. Whenever your distracted by one of your five senses, it interrupts your internal participation. Distractions come and go. Focus your eyes on what’s happening at the altar. That’s where the Lord makes Himself physically present in the Eucharist, and you want to receive all the graces you can to nourish you physically and spiritually.

Prayer is life-changing. It’s how we communicate with Christ and to deepen our relationship with Him, but we usually do all the talking. There are times in prayer where we need to listen to Him speak to us. In addition to praying the Rosary or other recited prayers, include silent prayer in your prayer regiment. Silent prayer (e.g. Ignatian Examen; Lectio Divina) is a deep and rich way to encounter Christ. Turn off all electronic devices when in silent prayer. You will find silent, contemplative prayer methods will enrich your prayer life.

We cannot completely get away from distractions. Our mind can be our worst enemy because it wanders from here to there. Ask Christ to help you. To shift your focus from yourself onto Him. He will guide you to a more devout life.

by John Connor

Related articles:
How to Become a Better Weekday Catholic
Patience is a Virtue
Lord, I’m Not Worthy

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